The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

1996 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

AN OPERATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE BIRD AVIAN TRANSPORT VENTILATOR

Timothy B. Op't Holt. Ed.D.R.R.T. University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama.

BACKGROUND: Transport of mechanically ventilated patients using a resuscitation bag may cause hyperventilation and an inconsistent tidal volume (V_{t}) and F_{102}, hence the development of transport ventilators. The AARC has issued a consensus statement and clinical practice guideline containing criteria for transport ventilators. This is the first evaluation of this ventilator to determine its consistency with specifications and guidelines, and case of clinical use. DESCRIPTION OF DEVICE: The ventilator is pneumatically powered, microprocessor controlled, time or pressure triggered, pressure limited, and time cycled and provides breaths in the control, assist control, SIMV or CPAP modes. All functions are set by rotating function-labeled knobs. EVALUATION Methods: Compliance of the ventilator with published guidelines and specifications, Vt delivery at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 L at 0.02, 0.04 and 0.10 L/cm H_{2}O compliance, pressure trigger and demand valve responsiveness, were evaluated on two ventilators borrowed from clinical service, using Michigan Instruments Training Test Lung and Pneu View software. Alarm functions and clinical case of use were also evaluated. EVALUATION Results: Tidal and sigh volumes, ventilatory rates, and inspiratory times were clinically consistent between the two ventilators tested. The delivered Vts varied from -8.8% to + 1.2% from the set value. Assist and demand valve sensitivities were within 1.0cm H_{2}O [0.1kPa] of the set values. When using the AMBU PEEP valve, expiratory pressures were 11-13 cm H_{2}O [.11-.13 kPa] above baseline. Alarms functioned within specifications. Gas consumption was 3.8 and 6.6 L/min for the two ventilators studied. Conclusions: The Avian conforms to the standards set in the literature and functions within manufacturer's specifications. Assist and demand valve sensitivities are consistent with that set on the ventilator and are sensitive to simulated patient effort. There is potential for increased expiratory work when using the AMBU PEEP valve.

Reference: OF-96-067

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