The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

1998 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

EVALUATION OF THE SENSICATH SYSTEM IN NEONATES WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE

Jenni L. Raake, RRT, P/P Specialist, Roozbeh Taeed, MD, Steven Schwartz, MD, David Nelson, MD, PhD Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

Background: Blood gas analysis is extremely important because ventilator manipulations play a central role in perioperative management of neonates. Neonates with cyanotic congenital heart defects have a lower pO_{2} due to shunting. Blood gas analysis is often delayed or compromised by the need to transport samples to a central laboratory which can complicate ventilator management. We evaluated a Sensicath System (Optical Sensors Incorporated, Eden Prairie, MN) on neonates after palliative surgery for congenital heart defects. We also recorded the specimen-result turn around time for simultaneous specimens analyzed by a central laboratory. Methods: After patients returned from the operating room, the Sensicath System was connected to the arterial line. Blood was pulled across the sensor and reinfused to the patient after analysis. A sample of blood was sent to the central laboratory simultaneously, and analyzed on a Corning 855 blood gas electrolyte analyzer (Chiron Diagnostics, Norwood, MA). Results of pH, pCO_{2}, and pO_{2} analyzed by the Sensicath System were compared to central laboratory values. The specimen-result turn around time was recorded. Correlations were made between results by examining accuracy and precision. Results: Correlations were: pO_{2}-- r^{2}=0.878, accuracy = -4.3 mm Hg, precision=12.1, pCO_{2}-r^{2}=0.587, accuracy = -0.6 mm Hg^{1}, precision 5.5, pH--r^{2}=0.803, accuracy=0.034 mm Hg, precision 0.028. Specimen-result turn around time was 13.8┬▒ 7.1 minutes. The Sensicath System provided results after a 60 second analysis time with no blood loss to the patient. Experience: Traditional blood gas analysis results in blood loss. A major advantage of the Sensicath System is elimination of iatrogenic blood loss. The blood is pulled across the sensor and reinfused into the patient after analysis. The sensor eliminates blood loss in two ways: there is no iatrogenic blood loss, and there is no waste or sampling necessary. Conclusions: The Sensicath System was found to provide reliable blood gas values when compared to a Corning 855 blood gas analyzer, while reducing iatrogenic blood loss. This system may be considered especially helpful in patients with congenital heart defects (especially neonates and infants) when rapid results are required for optimal patient care.

Table 1

Sensicath Blood Gas System vs Corning 855

pH pCO_{2}

# of samples 97 97

range 7.26 - 7.57 23 - 64 mm Hg

r^{2} 0.803 0.587

slope 0.912 0.860

intercept 0.688 5.492

accuracy 0.034 -0.6

precision 0.028 5.5

pO2 pO_{2} < 50 mm Hg

# of samples 97 68

range 33.6 - 181 mm Hg 33.6 - 49.1 mm Hg

r^{2} 0.878 0.077

slope 0.743 0.532

intercept 10.462 18.633

accuracy -4.3 -0.5

precision 12.1 7.9

The 44th International Respiratory Congress Abstracts-On-Disk®, November 7 - 10, 1998, Atlanta, Georgia.

You are here: RCJournal.com » Past OPEN FORUM Abstracts » 1998 Abstracts » EVALUATION OF THE SENSICATH SYSTEM IN NEONATES WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE