The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

1998 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

USE OF A NASAL DILATOR DEVICE DURING EXERCISE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE.

Phillip D. Hoberty, EdD. RRT The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Background: Patients with COPD are taught pursed-lip breathing during pulmonary rehabilitation to reduce and control dyspnea at rest and during exercise. Correct performance of this technique includes inhalation through the nose. It is also known that the use of a functional nasal dilator strip, eg. Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r) (CNS, Inc.), increases nasal valve area, reduces nasal airflow resistance, and contributes to performance during submaximal exercise in normal subjects. This study was conducted to determine if use of the Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r) by subjects with COPD who performed pursed-lip breathing during submaximal exercise allowed them to exercise longer or maintain a %SpO_{2} closer to baseline. Method: Twelve subjects, 7 men and 5 women with mild to moderate COPD, who had completed 6-8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation volunteered to participate in the study. They performed submaximal exercise via an incremental modified Balke treadmill protocol (maximal speed = 3 mph) under 3 conditions offered in random order: control (no nasal device), placebo (nasal device without plastic center core provided by the manufacturer), and Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r). Patients proceeded through the protocol until they reached level "7" (severe breathing or SOB) on a modified Borg scale of perceived dyspnea (range 0 - 10). Elapsed time in protocol and %SpO2 were recorded at each level of exercise. Percent change SpO_{2} was computed for each subject. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance using an alpha level of 0.05. Results: Table 1 presents the results. Although some subjects reported a subjective improvement in airflow through the nose with either placebo or Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r), there was no statistically significant increase in exercise time nor difference in percent change SpO_{2} as a result of using either placebo nor Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r).

Table 1. Mean (SD) exercise time and percentage of oxygen desaturation during submaximal exercise.

Control Placebo Breathe Right

Nasal Strip(r)

Exercise Time 12.93 13.38 13.37

(minutes)

Desaturation

(% change SpO_{2} 5.5 4.6 6.1

from baseline)

Conclusion: I concluded that using the Breathe Right Nasal Strip(r) did not contribute to lengthening the duration of submaximal exercise performance nor to preventing oxygen desaturation in this sample of COPD patients during submaximal exercise.

Partial funding for this project was provided by CNS, Inc., Minneapolis, MN.

The 44th International Respiratory Congress Abstracts-On-DiskĀ®, November 7 - 10, 1998, Atlanta, Georgia.

You are here: RCJournal.com » Past OPEN FORUM Abstracts » 1998 Abstracts » USE OF A NASAL DILATOR DEVICE DURING EXERCISE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE.