The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

1998 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

REACH OUT AND WEB SOMEONE: PUTTING YOUR COURSE ON THE INTERNET

Randy De Kler, M.S., RRT College of Health & Human Sciences Georgia State University Atlanta, GA rdekler@gsu.edu

Designing a course for Web delivery follows the same process that governs the design of any course. If the Dick and Carey model of instructional design is followed, the process begins with a needs analysis. This analysis determines if instruction is the appropriate solution to the perceived problem. Next, analyses of the learners and the content to be presented are conducted. Performance objectives are then written followed by the development of assessment instruments, instructional strategies and instructional materials. Finally, formative and summative evaluations are conducted at appropriate times throughout the course. In addition, revision may take place at any stage in the process. Instructional design for the Web must take into account and exploit its unique advantages and disadvantages to ensure instructional effectiveness and efficiency. One of the Web's unique characteristics is its ability to deliver many different content formats including text, images, animation, audio, and video to any location with a computer with appropriate software and an Internet connection. This location-independent feature give Web-based content delivery an obvious advantage over computer-based instruction alone. Delivering this wide variety has gotten easy to do and continues to get easier. It remains, however, a time consuming process with multimedia content taking up to 200 hours of development time for each hour of instruction. Once content has been addressed, the designer must choose from several different instructional strategies. Other than having the learner simply read text or view images or video or listen to audio, other interactive tools are available. Learner interaction and collaboration can be fostered through the use of synchronous computer conferencing (chat), asynchronous computer conferencing (threaded discussion lists), listservs, and e-mail. Videoconferencing promises to be of use once the current bandwidth problem is fixed. Finally, learner evaluation can be problematic especially when it must take place at a distance from the instructor. The availability of improved tools and resources will allow Web-based instruction to continue to grow in effectiveness.

The 44th International Respiratory Congress Abstracts-On-DiskĀ®, November 7 - 10, 1998, Atlanta, Georgia.

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