The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2000 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

THE COMMON CANISTER PROTOCOL USING THE MONAGHAN AEROCHAMBER REVEALS NO CROSS-CONTAMINATION AND POTENTIAL COST SAVINGS

Steven G. Sheils, RTS, Jennifer L. Duncan, RTS, William V. Wojciechowski, MS, RRT. Department of Cardiorespiratory Care, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL

Objective: Many respiratory therapy departments have implemented the common canister protocol (CCP) as a cost-saving measure. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of cross-contamination when using the Monaghan Aerochamber under the CCP and the potential cost-savings as a result of the protocol.

Methods:
Human subjects approval was obtained and data were collected at a university teaching hospital. The hospital's CCP was followed using the Monaghan Aerochamber. The study involved collection and culture of three specimen collections (cultures A, B, and C) on each subject, on two different media: sheep's blood and chocolate agar. A was obtained from the inside of the MDI mouthpiece following swabbing with an alcohol pad. Specimen B was obtained from the MDI mouthpiece following actuation and removal from the Aerochamber. Specimen C was obtained from the MDI mouthpiece after removing it from the Aerochamber and swabbing with an alcohol pad. Specimens were incubated for 72 hours. Probabilities for the number of positive cultures were calculated from a binomial distribution, with a significance level of 0.05. Previous studies indicated a potential hospital cost-savings of 55% for CCP over providing each patient with their own unique MDI. The current cost of MDIs at another university hospital that provides each patient with their own MDI was multiplied by 0.55 to determine the potential cost savings.

Results:
The sample included a total of 17 patients (6 males and 11 females) with a mean age of 54 years. MDI medications administered to the subjects included Flovent (fluticasone), Serevent (salmeterol), Aerobid (flunisolide), Atrovent (ipratropium bromide), and Ventolin (albuterol). There was no growth from any sample at 24, 48, or 72 hours. Conclusion: There was no cross contamination of MDIs when using the Monaghan Aerochamber under the CCP. The possibility exists that a 55% reduction in MDI purchase costs may be realized when implementing the CCP. This represents a savings of $13,922 from the present $25,312 spent for individually supplied MDIs at another local hospital.

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