The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2000 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

CLINICAL UTILITY OF THE ST. GEORGE'S RESPIRATORY QUESTIONNAIRE TO EVALUATE PULMONARY REHABILITATION

SHAZIA Salik CRT, Carmesha N. Taylor CRT, Deborah L. Cullen EdD, RRT, FAARC. Respiratory Therapy Program, School of Allied Health Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are developed to restore the patient to the highest possible level of function. In order for a patient to reach this level of independent function it is important to evaluate the effectiveness and monitor outcomes of pulmonary rehabilitation programs. One method of assessment is via health-related quality of life questionnaires. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the appropriateness of a hospital-based community pulmonary rehabilitation program and the utility of the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ).

Methods:
The St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire was used to evaluate the health-related quality of life outcomes for a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The questionnaire was mailed to 100 post-pulmonary graduates from a mid-west hospital-based program who had completed the program in the last 2 years. The questionnaire measured three domains: symptoms, activities, and impacts as well as a total cumulative score. Descriptive statistics were utilized to analyze the domain scores.

Results:
Of the 100 subjects 60 responded. The overall range of scores for all three domains can range from 0 to 100. (A score of zero indicates no impairment and a score of 100 indicates severe impairment.) The activity domain mean score was 68.16 ± 0.53 which indicates moderately severe impairment with physical activity and dyspnea. The symptom domain mean score was 47.69 ± 21.79, which indicates a moderate impairment with frequency of cough, wheeze and dyspnea, and duration and frequency of episodes of dyspnea and wheeze. The impact domain's mean score was 34.31 ± 20.96, which indicates a mild impairment with health status, employment, panic, and medication. CONCLUSION: The SGRQ demonstrated clinical utility for post-rehabilitation assessment which permits program modification. Based on the results from the participants of this study, it is concluded that the program may want to further evaluate intervention strategies for management of pulmonary activity and dyspnea, and consider implementing a phase II education portion that would deal with these problem areas in their post-pulmonary maintenance sessions.

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