The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2001 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

CREATION ANDIMPLEMENTATION OF A PATIENT TEACHING PLAN.

Elsie Collado-Koman,BS, RRT, RCP, Lori Taylor, RRT, RCP, Timothy Morris, M.D.. UCSD Medical Center,San Diego Ca.

Background:Education of the hospitalized patient in matters related to the managementof their disease at home is of most importance in today?s health care environment.Both the scientific content and the actual teaching method may have an impacton the patient?s long-term disease management. In order to assure that our practitioners?patient education sessions were accurate and consistent we implemented a department-widepatient teaching plan.

Method: Homeoxygen therapy was chosen as a topic for the initial implementation of the patientteaching plan. A team of respiratory care practitioners was assigned to createa teaching plan for patients being discharged from our hospital on home oxygentherapy. Materials on patient education, techniques on how to design and usepatient teaching modules, as well as various reading materials on home oxygenuse and devices were distributed prior to each meeting. The team met in fourdifferent occasions. The first steps in the creation of the teaching modulewere to describe the learner (patient) and his/her learning needs, then to establishan educational goal. The overall goal was broken down into specific and attainableobjectives. Each objective was assigned an expected outcome, content, teachingpacket and evaluation tool. Before being trained in the new patient teachingplan, seventy-eight RCPs were asked to demonstrate how to teach a patient theappropriate use of home oxygen therapy. They then underwent the departmentaltraining program for patient teaching. They were then asked again to demonstratehow to teach patients how to use home oxygen.

Results:Prior to being trained in the departmental teaching plan, the practitionersused a variety of methods for patient education, most if which were inconsistentlypresented and difficult to follow and remember. When the patient teaching planwas distributed and the practitioners had the opportunity to rehearse, we observeda more consistent approach to the type of information presented to the patientand evaluation of the learning outcomes. The distribution of handouts followedmore defined guidelines and evaluation of each learning outcome was observedbefore the therapist moved on to the next objective.

Conclusion:Patient teaching plans provide for more structured and organized patient teachingsessions. They are useful tools for providing continuity and excellence in patientcare. Teaching plans, maintained by our education coordinator, are now routinelyused in patient education in our department. This program may serve as a modelfor other institutions interested in improving patient education in diseasemanagement.

OF-01-245

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Background:Education of the hospitalized patient in matters related to the managementof their disease at home is of most importance in today?s health care environment.Both the scientific content and the actual teaching method may have an impacton the patient?s long-term disease management. In order to assure that our practitioners?patient education sessions were accurate and consistent we implemented a department-widepatient teaching plan.

Method: Homeoxygen therapy was chosen as a topic for the initial implementation of the patientteaching plan. A team of respiratory care practitioners was assigned to createa teaching plan for patients being discharged from our hospital on home oxygentherapy. Materials on patient education, techniques on how to design and usepatient teaching modules, as well as various reading materials on home oxygenuse and devices were distributed prior to each meeting. The team met in fourdifferent occasions. The first steps in the creation of the teaching modulewere to describe the learner (patient) and his/her learning needs, then to establishan educational goal. The overall goal was broken down into specific and attainableobjectives. Each objective was assigned an expected outcome, content, teachingpacket and evaluation tool. Before being trained in the new patient teachingplan, seventy-eight RCPs were asked to demonstrate how to teach a patient theappropriate use of home oxygen therapy. They then underwent the departmentaltraining program for patient teaching. They were then asked again to demonstratehow to teach patients how to use home oxygen.

Results:Prior to being trained in the departmental teaching plan, the practitionersused a variety of methods for patient education, most if which were inconsistentlypresented and difficult to follow and remember. When the patient teaching planwas distributed and the practitioners had the opportunity to rehearse, we observeda more consistent approach to the type of information presented to the patientand evaluation of the learning outcomes. The distribution of handouts followedmore defined guidelines and evaluation of each learning outcome was observedbefore the therapist moved on to the next objective.

Conclusion:Patient teaching plans provide for more structured and organized patient teachingsessions. They are useful tools for providing continuity and excellence in patientcare. Teaching plans, maintained by our education coordinator, are now routinelyused in patient education in our department. This program may serve as a modelfor other institutions interested in improving patient education in diseasemanagement.