The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2001 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS AND SMOKING CESSATION

N. Pearman, M. Pitcher, D.Hudson, BS, RRT & D. Cullen, EdD, RRT, FAARC, Respiratory Therapy Program, Schools of Allied Health Sciences and Medicine,Nicotine Treatment Center, Indiana University

Background:This study was performed to determine the relationship between mental illnessand smoking cessation and to describe the smoking-related characteristics ofmentally ill patients enrolled in a university-based tobacco treatment program.The reasons for mentally ill patients smoking are multiple. Cessation techniquesoffer innovative strategies to assist quitting. Resent research has demonstratedthat persons with mental illness are about twice as likely to smoke as otherindividuals. Methodology: This study utilized a descriptive design consisting ofa convenience sample of seventy adult patients enrolled at a local cessationprogram in central Indiana. Patients included meet the criteria for a mentalillness as defined by a diagnosis of bipolar, schizophrenia, depression, ora history of alcohol or drug abuse. Data were collected by extraction from themedical records including the participant?s gender, age, medical history, smokinghistory, history of drug/alcohol use, the stage of quitting status, the Zungscore, Fagerstrom test, and the Horn score. 3 and 6 month quit ratios were alsodetermined.

Results: Theaverage age of initial smoking was 19.5 years for 39.9 pack years with 81.4%smoking non-menthol cigarettes. The average number of quit attempts was 4.1with 91% of patients smoking filtered cigarettes. 55.7% of patients were inthe readiness stage with a Fagerstrom score of 6.9 indicating addiction level.Zung scores noted mild depression overall. The Horn test indicated that tensionreduction (12.6), relaxation (11.5) and craving (12.2) were the major factorsto why these patients smoked. Pre-treatment CO level was 42.7 PPM and post-treatmentwas 22.6 PPM for the patient population in this study. The 3-month quit ratewas 45.7% with the 6 month quit rate at 44.3%.

Conclusion:Patients enrolled that are classified as mentally ill have less than a 50% quitrate at 3 or 6 months. These patients have indicted a desire to quit but facemany difficulties during the treatment process. Patients? smoking-related characteristicsand mental illness histories might have important implications for treatmentdesign and success.

OF-01-071

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N. Pearman, M. Pitcher, D.Hudson, BS, RRT & D. Cullen, EdD, RRT, FAARC, Respiratory Therapy Program, Schools of Allied Health Sciences and Medicine,Nicotine Treatment Center, Indiana University

Background:This study was performed to determine the relationship between mental illnessand smoking cessation and to describe the smoking-related characteristics ofmentally ill patients enrolled in a university-based tobacco treatment program.The reasons for mentally ill patients smoking are multiple. Cessation techniquesoffer innovative strategies to assist quitting. Resent research has demonstratedthat persons with mental illness are about twice as likely to smoke as otherindividuals. Methodology: This study utilized a descriptive design consisting ofa convenience sample of seventy adult patients enrolled at a local cessationprogram in central Indiana. Patients included meet the criteria for a mentalillness as defined by a diagnosis of bipolar, schizophrenia, depression, ora history of alcohol or drug abuse. Data were collected by extraction from themedical records including the participant?s gender, age, medical history, smokinghistory, history of drug/alcohol use, the stage of quitting status, the Zungscore, Fagerstrom test, and the Horn score. 3 and 6 month quit ratios were alsodetermined.

Results: Theaverage age of initial smoking was 19.5 years for 39.9 pack years with 81.4%smoking non-menthol cigarettes. The average number of quit attempts was 4.1with 91% of patients smoking filtered cigarettes. 55.7% of patients were inthe readiness stage with a Fagerstrom score of 6.9 indicating addiction level.Zung scores noted mild depression overall. The Horn test indicated that tensionreduction (12.6), relaxation (11.5) and craving (12.2) were the major factorsto why these patients smoked. Pre-treatment CO level was 42.7 PPM and post-treatmentwas 22.6 PPM for the patient population in this study. The 3-month quit ratewas 45.7% with the 6 month quit rate at 44.3%.

Conclusion:Patients enrolled that are classified as mentally ill have less than a 50% quitrate at 3 or 6 months. These patients have indicted a desire to quit but facemany difficulties during the treatment process. Patients? smoking-related characteristicsand mental illness histories might have important implications for treatmentdesign and success.