The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2002 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

Characteristics of Our new Respiratory Cuff Monitor

Tetsuo Miyagawa1, Norio Kihara2, Hiroki Goshima3.
1. Department of Physical Therapeutics, Showa University, School of Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences, Yokohama, Japan; 2. Kihara Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3. SECOM Co. LTD, Research & Develop Center, The First Medical Team, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: We already reported that your new respiratory cuff monitor had high reliability in AARC 47th International Respiratory Congress. The correlation coefficients between chest and abdominal cuff pressure, and pulmonary function testing were significantly high in healthy subjects and patients with respiratory disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of our new respiratory cuff monitor; we studied the disease specificity and reproducibility in healthy subjects and patients with respiratory disease.

Methods: We analyzed chest and abdominal wave forms of cuff pressure and compared with the measurements of pulmonary function testing, respiratory muscle strength and chest expansion. Twenty-one healthy subjects, seven patients with chronic asthma, two patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and one patient with post TB participated in the trial. We also measured several times to know the reproducibility of this monitor in these subjects.

Results: The reproducibility of spirometry and our respiratory cuff monitor in healthy subjects and respiratory disease patients had significantly reliability (r=0.58~0.97, p<0.005). cuff pressure change in resting ventilation had high correlation not only resting breathing, but also forced expiratory and inspiratory ventilation. Rapid cuff pressures rising in FVC maneuver were recognized in asthma patients (p<0.005), the negative correlation coefficients between cuff pressure and FEV1.0, PEFR at spirometry were in highly significant (r=0.615, p<0.001). Rapid cuff pressures rising had high correlation coefficients with respiratory muscle strength and cuff pressure in resting ventilation, FEV1.0 and PEFR (r=0.33~0.72, p<0.05~0.003). Konno-Mead Diagram in respiratory cuff monitor could detect whether respiratory pattern of chest wall and abdomen was coordinating or paradoxical breathing. The correlation coefficients between coordination breathing pattern on Konno-Mead diagram and cuff pressure was in highly significant, however, interrelationship between spirogram and Konno-Mead diagram were not shown.

Conclusions: Our simple respiratory cuff monitor had no load and high reproducibility in pulmonary disease patients. Cuff pressure change in resting ventilation had high correlation not only resting breathing, but also forced expiratory and inspiratory ventilation. It seemed that the rapid cuff pressure rising in FVC maneuver suggested airflow limitation.

OF-02-138

You are here: RCJournal.com » Past OPEN FORUM Abstracts » 2002 Abstracts » Characteristics of Our new Respiratory Cuff Monitor