The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2005 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

PREDICTING COPD, A STUDY OF GENDER DIFFERENCE

Marilyn Duran PhD, RN. Doctorial dissertation, April 2005. Health Studies Department Texas Women's University Denton, Texas.

Background: The purpose of this study was to perform a secondary analysis of the National Health Interview Survey 2002 data to investigate the factors associated with COPD. My null hypotheses for this study was that age, geographical location, age at which started smoking, health behaviors, functional behaviors, economics, and education level does not predict COPD morbidity among U.S. women.

Methods:
A total of 4779 questionnaires were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic characteristics of participants. Correlations were used to test for relationships between continuous variables: age, age first stared smoking regularly, and activity total. Nonparametric Mann Whitney U was used to identify significant differences between individuals with and without COPD on these continuous variables. Chi Square tests were used to test for significant associations between having COPD and the various levels of the categorical variables gender, ethnicity, education level, marital status, income, and region. Variables that were found to be significantly associated with COPD were used in a stepwise multiple logistic regression to identify the odds-ratio of statistically significant variables between males and females that affect a participant's diagnosis of COPD.

Results:
154 of the 4779 participants reported that they had COPD. Activity difficulty was the only significant predictor of COPD for men. Men who had greater difficulty with activity were 1.154 times more likely to have COPD. For women, however, age, smoking status, and activity difficulty were significant predictors of COPD status. Women who were older were 1.069 times more likely to have COPD than women who were younger. Women who had greater difficulty with activity were 4.029 times more likely to have COPD. Women who were current everyday smokers were 6.482 times more likely to have COPD than former smokers. Every participant (100%) reported that they had received the flu shot in the past year, and no one reported having a pneumonia shot within the past 5 years.

Conclusion: Among women I found that age, activity difficulty, and smoking status were significant predictors of COPD. For men activity difficulty was the only significant predictor of COPD. Pneumonia vaccination rates are poor. 100% of participants reported they did not receive the pneumonia vaccination.

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