The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2006 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

THE INCIDENCE OF VENTILATOR-ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA AND THE COST OF CATHETERS ACCORDING TO THE FREQUENCY OF IN-LINE SUCTION CATHETERS CHANGES

 

Ara Synn, CCRN, MSN1, Bok Num Doh, DPN2, Chae Man Lim, M.D.3 Asan Medical Center1, Department of Nursing, Kyungpook National University2, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Ulsan University College of Medicine3, Seoul, Korea

Background: A common strategy for reducing the risk of VAP (ventilator-associated pneumonia) includes less frequent changing of ventilator equipment such as tubing, in-line suction catheter, and so on. However, there are no definite protocols established, and different hospitals have been using different protocols. Most hospitals in Korea change ventilator tubing every week, and the in-line suction catheter every two days. In this study the cost of in-line suction catheters and the rate of VAP according to how frequently equipment is changed was investigated to provide guidance for more efficient use.

Methods:
Subjects were divided into two groups: a group of 73 patients hospitalized in the intensive care units of a university hospital, in whom in-line suction catheters were changed every two days (March through September of 2003); and another group of 73 patients (March through September of 2004), in whom in-line suction catheters were changed every 4 to 7 days, together with ventilator tubing or as needed. General characteristics and ICU and the rate of VAP and catheter change were investigated. Data were retrospectively collected from medical records; frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, t-test, and chi-square were analyzed based on SPSS.

Results: The incidence of VAP according was 9.7 for the 4- to 7-day group and 13 for the 2-day group. There was no statistical significance of the incidence of VAP (p > 0.05); however, there was a lower tendency in the 4- to 7-day group. Changing in-line suction catheters every 2 days instead of 4 to 7 days could reduce the cost of catheters by around $65 per patient (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: We concluded that changing in-line suction catheters less frequently, together with changing ventilator tubing every 4 to 7 days (compared to every two days), saved costs and did not significantly affect frequency of VAP. These findings confirm the results of previous studies that support the policy of changing in-line suction catheters.


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