The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2007 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

JUSTIFYING THE NEED FOR RESPIRATORY THERAPISTS AT ALL C-SECTIONS: RELATIONSHIPS OF C-SECTIONS AND RESPIRATORY INTERVENTIONS ON NEWBORNS

J. Huebner1, L. T. Goodfellow2

Background
The number of C-sections continues to increase nationwide. The aim of this study is to investigate the need for respiratory therapists at all C-sections, including those that are not considered "high risk" or emergent. The objective is to determine any relationships that are significant to the field of respiratory therapy.

Methods
A retrospective study was performed by collecting data from department copies of respiratory delivery records of infants between the dates of July 2006- December 2006. The total number of deliveries performed at this hospital from July-December 2006 was 3,305 with 1,161 being C-sections. Data was then subdivided into infants delivered via C-section with Activity, Pulse, Grimace, Appearance & Respiration Scores (APGARS) ≦ 8,8. Infants < 36 weeks were omitted from this study. Each record was reviewed to determine if any respiratory intervention was given to the infant. Respiratory interventions for this review included: positive pressure ventilation (PPV), chest physical therapy (CPT), and continous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Statistical tests used to analyze the data included: descriptive statistics (frequency, percentages), along with bivariate correlations with a test of significance at the 0.05 level. R2 values were calculated to understand the basic level of variance.

Results
Positive Correlations were found for the following variables: the number of repeat sections and PPV (p=.814,R2=.66). Primary C-sectioned infants with abnormal APGARS required 41% PPV but required less intervention of CPAP (21%) and CPT(8%). The repeat C-sectioned infants required 24% PPV but required more CPAP (25%) and CPT (27%).

Conclusion
In conclusion, the data obtained statistically supports the need for a respiratory therapist to be present at all C-sections. The primary C-sectioned infants required an increase in need for PPV while the repeat C-sectioned infants required more CPAP and CPT to assist with their transitioning time. More research is needed to fully understand these relationships.