The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

CRITICAL TASKS OF THE DATAARC ADULT NASAL CANNULA COMPETENCY: A SURVEY OF RESPIRATORY CARE EDUCATORS

Patrick Evans1,2, Kathy Jones-Boggs-Rye2, Robert Kennedy3; 1Respiratory Care Program, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Texarkana, AR; 2Department of Respiratory and Surgical Technologies, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR; 3Nursing Scholarship and Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR

Background: Respiratory care students are educated to perform a variety of patient care procedures. Ensuring correct procedure competency, students are trained to follow task lists that guide procedure performance. DataArc (http://www.dataarc.ws/) published a comprehensive set of respiratory clinical competencies now in common use. This study examines what task items in the DataArc adult nasal cannula competency are considered critical to success by an ad hoc group of respiratory care educators and if group demographics influence selection of critical tasks. Method: Respiratory care educators attending “A Method of Evaluating Inter-rater Reliability” during 2007 AARC Summer Forum (N = 127) voluntarily participated in a mock preceptor training session. During the session educators completed surveys and competencies. A survey asked educators to identify which of the 28 task items on the DataArc Adult Nasal Cannula competency were critical for successful competency completion. Responses were examined as a whole and comparisons made with subgroups: college degree, years in Respiratory Care and Respiratory Care education, current role, educational setting, and whether they attended student clinical rotations. The results were evaluated using descriptive, Chi square and ANOVA quantitative statistical methods. Results: The study sample was not in 100% agreement on any task item as being critical for competency completion. All subgroup comparisons had degrees of difference but none were statistically significant. Rank ordering the task items revealed the highest agreement with “Verifies physician’s order for appropriateness or evaluates procedure based on hospital protocol” at 95.2%. The lowest agreement was “Confirms patient and/or family understanding of the procedure” at 49.6%. The average agreement was 78% for 28 tasks. Conclusions: Participants lacked agreement about which items were critical in an adult nasal cannula competency. No demographic characteristic identified a specific group as being out of norm, indicating results were similar for all participants. Lack of agreement on the critical tasks of the adult nasal cannula competency indicates student assessment is based on educator preference and not accepted an standard of procedure performance. Further discussion is indicated to establish consensus about what task items should be designated critical and non-critical. Study results indicate other respiratory care competencies should be evaluated. Sponsored Research - None

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