The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

EVALUATION OF A NEW CIRCUIT CONFIGURATION FOR THE VDR-4® HIGH FREQUENCY PERCUSSIVE VENTILATOR

Kathy Short1, Samuel W. Jones2, Bruce A. Cairns2, William J. Hanson1, Anthony G. Charles2; 1Respiratory Care, UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Department of Surgery, UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC

Background: The VDR-4 ® high frequency percussive ventilator (HFPV) is primarily used in the management of inhalation injuries. The standard VDR-4 ® ventilator circuit consists of the ventilator connected to pressure tubing and a sliding venturi manifold made of molded hard plastic that is directly attached to the endotracheal tube (ETT). The hard plastic manifold is heavy and can cause undue torque on the patient’s ETT. In this study, we evaluate a new circuit for the VDR-4® that relocates the sliding venturi mechanism away from the ETT and into the ventilator proper in order to eliminate the potential for undue torque on the airway. Method: The VDR-4 ® ventilator was connected to the Ingmar Medical Adult/Pediatric Demonstration Test Lung and the PMG 3000 data collection module using both the standard or experimental condition and different levels of compliance and resistance measured. Each circuit was tested with the operating pressure set at 45 psi, oscillatory peep at 5 cmH2O, inspiratory time at 2 seconds, a respiratory rate of 12 breaths per minute and high frequency percussive rates set at 600 pulses per minute and were not changed. Experimental conditions included varying peak inspiratory pressures from 20, 25, 30, 35 to 40cmH2O, varying compliance levels from 20, 30 to 40ml/cmH2O and changing resistance levels from 10, 15 to 50cmH2O/Liter. Results: For all of the given variables the difference in the PIP and PEEP measured between the old and new circuit was insignificant and would not be expected to influence the clinical effectiveness of the VDR-4 ventilator. Conclusion: Our evaluation demonstrated that the new manifold maintains clinically effective levels of PIP and PEEP while decreasing the weight of the manifold and subsequently the torque on an artificial airway. This new configuration may have an important impact on patient safety as well as the use of HFPV in the management of inhalation injury. Sponsored Research - None

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