The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

COPING WITH LOSS AND DEATH AND DYING ISSUES OF RESPIRATORY CARE STUDENTS

Thomas J. Stokes, Gregg Marshall, Christopher Russian; Respiratory Care, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX

Background: The objective of the project is to assess first-year respiratory care students perceptions of death and dying using the revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death and Dying Scale (CL-FODS) pre and post tests prior to their first instructional module (clinical rotation), and post-clinical Respiratory Care Practice I rotation (N=24). Assessment of pre, post-test, and post-clinical scores measuring death anxiety were measured and analyzed. Research Question: Will the use of the CL-FODS influence students’ level of death anxiety in dealing with patient care as measured during pre and post clinical experience? Methodology: An enhancement grant proposal was approved for IRB exemption (ref # 5-12218). Since pre-clinical training takes place during the spring semester, prior to their initial clinical rotation, students were first given the CL-FODS pre-test prior to instruction via a didactic teaching module on Death and Dying issues and then given the post-test immediately after. Students then completed 160 clinical contact hours in a 5-week clinical summer rotation. Student perception was then reassessed in the form of a post-clinical test. The CLFODS contains thirty-two test questions divided evenly asking students to assess their feelings of “Your Own Death”, “Your Own Dying”, and “The Dying of Others” using a 5-point Likert scale. The modified CL-FODS post-clinical instrument contained thirty-three questions, with the additional question asking if they had experianced a death and dying situation during their rotation. Results: Repeated mesures ANOVA was performed to examine the mean differences between the subjects from three different intervals and the f value reported (f = 0.844) indicated no significant differences between the means of pre-, post-, post-clinical CL-FODS test scores (p=0.437) Conclusion: The findings of the study shows that the exposure of students to death and dying didactic and clinical situations does not lead to an increased death anxiety score among respiratory therapy students. However, qualitative data did show empathy towards the patients, family members and other health care providers Sponsored Research - None

Results of Analysis of Variance Comparing Differences Between Pre. Post, and Post-Clinical test Scores of CL-FODS

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