The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

THE USE OF FULL PSG MONITORING WITH A NOVEL OXYGEN CONSERVING DEVICE TO DETERMINE TRIGGERING AND OXYGENATION CAPABILITIES DURING SLEEP

Bob McCoy1, Todd Eiken2, Brian Carlin3, Ryan Diesem1, Jason McCoy1; 1Valley Inspired Products, Apple Valley, MN; 2Mays & Associates, Brentwood, TN; 3Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Drexel University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

Background: New portable oxygen delivery systems are becoming more widely available to improve clinical capabilities with lower overall expense. Concern related to the products’ oxygen delivery capabilities with exercise and sleep have limited the full acceptance of these products as a single unit option. Clinicians encourage the use of a stationary or continuous flow unit during sleep. Some clinical studies have shown conserving devices employed by portable concentrators have the capability to oxygenate a patient. The purpose of this study was to monitor select oxygen patients with full PSG to determine breathing status while determining the oxygenation and triggering capabilities of a novel oxygen conserving device. Method: Study protocol was approved by an Investigational Review Board (IRB) and patient informed consents were obtained. Patients were screened with overnight oximetery to determine oxygenation on their existing home oxygen system and to screen for sleep disordered breathing. Eight patients were then tested in a sleep lab with full PSG monitoring of sleep and respiratory function. A novel OCD was connected to the PSG to monitor pulse delivery of the unit. The novel OCD had the capability to switch to continuous flow (CF) if a reduction in airflow caused the device to not trigger for 30 seconds. The device would then deliver one minute of CF oxygen and then switch back to a seek mode for oxygen conservation. If still no airflow was detected the device would switch to CF for another cycle. Results: All patients screened negative for desatruation on their home oxygen system. When tested in the lab, four of the patients showed multiple instances of sleep disordered breathing. This disorganized breathing was disruptive to their sleep hygiene with arousals, yet there were no significant desaturations. All patients were able to maintain oxygen saturation levels with the novel OCD yet, due to SDB, four of the patients routinely triggered the OCD’s CF mode during the night. All patients felt the novel OCD was acceptable as an oxygen delivery system with sleep and none of the patients indicated that the device or pulse flow delivery was disruptive to their sleep. Conclusions: The novel OCD was able to maintain oxygenation for the eight patients tested without the device disturbing their sleep. Four of the patients’ breathing patterns were not sufficient to trigger the device, but the CF mode back up was able to maintain adequate oxygen levels. Sponsored Research - None

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