The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

PHYSIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF A PULMONARY REHABILITATION PROGRAM

Dave Burnett1,2, Jane Burnett2, Steve Burns1,2; 1University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO; 2Summit Rehab, Lee’s Summit, MO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological benefits of a pulmonary rehabilitation program. This study examined the pre and post rehabilitation measures related to Endurance Training (ET) versus ET combined with Functional Strength Training (FT) in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Sixteen subjects were divided into two equal groups. Control group (n=8) consisted of ET only and experimental group (n=8) performed ET+FT. Subjects were selectively put into groups to facilitate a homogeneous pre-rehabilitation design. Mean ages in ET and ET+FT were (77 + 4) and (74 + 7) respectively. Both ET and ET+FT groups performed three functional strength tests; 1) Sitto- Stand, 2) Lift-Carry, and 3) Stair Climb. Lift-Carry and Stair Climb tests were one minute and measured distance in feet and number of stairs climbed and descended. A physiological test on a cycle ergometer was performed on each subject pre and post rehabilitation during separate days from the functional strength tests. Measurements obtained during the physiological tests included maximum oxygen consumption (VO2), minute ventilation (VE), and maximum sustained watts. Rehabilitation took place twice a week x 8 weeks and progressed in intensity based on each subjects exercise tolerance measured by the Borg dyspnea scale. Subjects in the ET group participated in exercise on a treadmill, cycle ergometer, and an arm ergometer. In contrast the ET+FT group performed exercise training on a treadmill, cycle ergometer, and all three functional strength modalities including Sit-Stand, Lift-Carry, and Stair Climb. Exercise time for each group remained constant while the ET+FT group substituted FT exercise time for ET. Results: After 16 sessions subjects in the ET+FT group demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase in Stair Climb (48 vs. 68 stairs) and Lift-Carry (109 vs. 146 feet). No significant differences were noted in the ET group during this study. Conclusion: Subjects diagnosed with COPD improve Stair Climb and Lift-Carry functional ability when functional strength training is introduced into their rehabilitation program design. Key words: respiratory therapy, muscle atrophy, pulmonary function tests Sponsored Research - None

You are here: RCJournal.com » Past OPEN FORUM Abstracts » 2009 Abstracts » PHYSIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF A PULMONARY REHABILITATION PROGRAM