The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

USING SPECIALIZED PEDIATRIC TEAMS TO TRANSPORT INTERHOSPITAL PATIENTS RODNEY PLAPP RRT,SHELLY SMITH RRT

Rodney S. Plapp, Shelly R. Smith; PACU, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

PURPOSE: The purpose of this observational study is to show the importance of a specialized pediatric team (Registered Nurse, Respiratory Therapist, a Physician or Nurse Practitioner) to transport interhospital neonatal and pediatric patients to procedures that require the mobilization of the high risk patient. The use of state-of-the-art medical equipment has become an essential part of patient care. However, using such high-tech products mean you need well-trained high-tech staff. A specialized interhospital transport team develops practices that decrease the occurrence of morbidity while increasing patient safety. Interhospital transport also allows primary staff to stay in the ICU, continuing to provide patient care. SETTING: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital is a full service, not for profit pediatric academic medical center with 511 beds. There were 516 high risk patients, transported in house, for diagnostic testing in fiscal year 2007- 2008. The transport team transports an average of 10.75 patients a week. The patients were considered high risk if they had an artificial airway, were ventilated with positive pressure, hemodynamically unstable, or neurologically compromised. INTERVENTION: The transport team receives a safe handoff report from the primary nurse. Vital signs and oxygen saturation are measured. The airway is checked for patency, proper placement, and security. The patient is placed on transport compatible equipment (ventilator, pumps, and monitor). If a patient can not tolerate a transport ventilator, they may be hand bagged. Some patients may require Nitric Oxide administration during transport, which can be placed in-line in either the ventilator circuit or via a disposable anesthesia bag. The patient is continously reassessed for synchrony and stability. Events such as loss of intravenous access, endotracheal tube extubation, and exhaustion of oxygen supply would be considered serious safety events. Results: Of the 516 patients transported, there was one event reported. The patient survived and had no long term morbidity. Conclusions: Having a specialized pediatric transport team may improve patient outcomes by preventing serious safety events from occuring during transport. It also assures safe hand-off of patients between caregivers. A specialized team enhances communication and relieves anxiety among family members as well. Sponsored Research - None

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