The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2009 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

A BENCH STUDY TO COMPARE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTO-ADJUSTING CPAP UNITS IN RESPONSE TO AWAKE BREATHING

Bob McCoy, Ryan Diesem; Valley Inspired Products, Apple Valley, MN

Background: Numerous bench studies have shown that Auto-Adjusting Continuous Positive Airway Pressure devices (APAPs) respond differently to identical breathing patterns. New APAP units are introduced to the market on a regular basis, many with additional features and benefits that may or may not impact device performance. The purpose of this bench test was to evaluate the performance of one APAP device with a feature the manufacturer claims responds to an aroused/awake patient by quickly decreasing therapy pressure. Unit performance was then compared to three other APAP units currently on the market to see how each APAP responded to the same breath pattern. Method: Four unique APAP devices (Fisher & Paykel SleepStyle 200; Puritan-Bennett GoodKnight 420E; ResMed S8 AutoSet Vantage; Respironics REMStar M-Series Auto) were tested on the bench using a Hans-Rudolph Series 1101 breathing simulator programmed with breathing patterns simulating a variety of sleep breath patterns (Normal, Apnea, and Awake). Each APAP device was set to deliver pressures between 4cmH2O and 20cmH2O. Each device was subjected to a 30 minute pre-conditioning using a Normal breathing pattern. Following pre-conditioning, an Apnea pattern was run for 20 minutes, followed by a three minute period of Awake breathing, 17 minutes of Normal breathing, 20 minutes of Apnea breathing, and then Normal breathing for the remainder of the test period. The pressure response by each APAP unit was recorded throughout the preconditioning and the duration of the test. The delivered pressures for each of the devices was then compared. Results: All units completed the bench test with no difficulties. All units exhibited unique pressure delivery responses to the breathing sequence. Three units showed a rapid pressure increase to the Apnea pattern. The SleepStyle 200 unit, the APAP device featuring an awake detection algorithm, rapidly decreased pressure during the Awake pattern; no other unit showed significant response during the same period. All units had unique methods of lowering therapy pressure during Normal breathing after event-related breath sequences. Conclusions: Each APAP had unique pressure responses to the same breathing pattern. A physician prescribing Auto- Adjust CPAP devices for a patient should be aware of product differences and be familiar with the unique capabilities and features of each device. Sponsored Research - Fisher & Paykel

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