The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2010 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

EVALUATION OF THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY HEALTH COACH TRAINING PROGRAM

Crystal L. Dunlevy, Derick T. Asah, Alodie P. Lim, Donica C. Marks, Lacey A. Schissler-Lambotte, Lauren M. Speakman; School of Allied Medical Professions, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

BACKGROUND: Competent health coaches have the ability to positively affect client health outcomes, yet the medical literature lacks standards for the development of health coach training programs. We evaluated a four-day training program for OSU Health Coaches that included equal parts didactic instruction about nine health risk assessment areas and hands on practice using motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. METHOD: Seven trainees completed content examinations on health risk assessment areas and Likert-type surveys that assessed confidence with MI techniques and self-efficacy with all components of health coaching, both before and after training, and 90 days post-training. Scores were compared using paired t-tests, with p < 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: Post-training assessment revealed a significant increase in confidence using MI techniques (p = 0.04) and improvement in all other areas of health coaching. Regarding MI, participants maintained their level of confidence 90 months post-training compared with pre-training (p = 0.03). Confidence levels with MI at 90 days did not differ from post-training (p = 0.62). Improvements in other aspects of health coaching were also maintained at 90 days, but they did not reach a level of statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the use of a training program that devotes the same amount of time to hands-on practice using MI techniques as it does to didactic information about components of a typical health coaching session on the various risk assessment topics. Sponsored Research - None