The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2010 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

BRIDGING THE KNOWLEDGE GAP BETWEEN THE BEDSIDE RESPIRATORY THERAPIST AND THE EVIDENCE: EDUCATING RESPIRATORY THERAPISTS ON THE USE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE SKILLS

Abby Motz, Cynthia White; Division of Respiratory Care, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

Background: Practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM) is becoming a standard within our healthcare system. Today’s registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) need to be prepared to engage and participate in EBM. Learning the necessary skills to contribute in evidence-based practice (EBP) is not a part of standard curriculum taught in most respiratory therapy programs. The Point-of-Care (POC) scholar program was designed to prepare the healthcare team at our institution on the importance of understanding and participating in EBP. 2009 marked the first year in which RRTs were permitted to participate in this program. The program was designed to teach the following: developing a PICO question, searching and critically appraising the literature, evidence summary, and developing a care recommendation and/or change in current practice. This program took place over one year, on a designated weekly eight hour day. The RRTs salaries were paid for by the institution’s Center of Professional Excellence. The RRTs developed separate PICO questions, literature searches and appraisals, evidence summaries, and practice changes. Two RRTs, upon application review, were selected to partake in the POC program. Scheduled program updates were given by the RRTs to the hospital’s intra-disciplinary and respiratory care professional inquiry councils. Method: A survey was developed and distributed to 8 key stakeholders to evaluate the involvement of the RRTs in the POC program. Results: There was 100% compliance from the stakeholders in completing the survey (See Table 1). Survey results indicated that 100% of the respondents felt: the POC program was a worthwhile investment for the institution, the POC RRTs shared valuable knowledge gained and could be EPB mentors, and practicing EBP skills were important for RRTs to learn. Conclusion: As a direct result of this program, both RRTs developed research projects and one RRT will develop a new hospital policy. The respiratory care division has added the POC program and EBP mentors into long term planning goals. The POC RRTs will continue to educate and mentor fellow RRTs on the EBP process. Sponsored Research - None

Evaluation of RRTs in the POC program