The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2010 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

SURVEY OF EXISSTING CONDITIONS OF TEH RESPIRATORY CARE TEAM IN JAPAN: AN ANALYSIS OF IMPACT FACTORS

Nakanishi Miki1,2, Miyagawa Tetsuo1, Ashworth J. Lonny3; 1Division of Respiratory Care, Graduate School of Showa University, Yokohama, Japan; 2nursing department, Osaka University Medical school Hospital, Suita, Japan; 3Respiratory care, Boise State University, Boise, ID

BACKGROUND: Respiratory Care is not recognized as a profession in Japan. Therefore, this role is performed by a respiratory care team, which includes nurses, physical therapists, clinical engineers and physicians. The purpose of this study is to survey the current status of respiratory care teams in Japan, and also to analyze the impact factors of the teams. METHOD: The subjects of this survey were nurses, physical therapists, clinical engineers and physicians in Japan. We randomly selected subjects for this survey in Japanese respiratory care related journals. We surveyed 370 individuals at 39 hospitals who were members of the respiratory care team, and 427 individuals at 39 hospitals who were not members of the respiratory care team. The method of this study was a mail-in questionnaire survey from October 1 to November 20, 2008. RESULTS: We received 249 questionnaires (31% return rate), and 196 valid responses (24.6% response rate). The respiratory care team group was significantly higher than the none-team group regarding years of clinical experience (P <.01). The leader of the team was a physician (50% of the team groups) or a nurse (38.9% of the team groups). The average number of people on the team was 14. The team activities included rounding on patients who received mechanical ventilation (70.5%), providing workshops for team members (69.7%) and providing workshops for the medical staff (85.6%). Five factors were evaluated: “work environment;” “ability of the individual;” “specialties and education;” “system of organization;” “motivation”. The respiratory care team group had a significantly higher score than the none-team group regarding “work environment”, “ability of the individual” (P<.01) and “motivation” (P<.05). The respiratory care team group differed significantly from the none-team group for each of the items within the “work environment” (P<.05). However, there was no significant difference between groups in the items related to technique and assessment skills evaluated as “ability of the individual”. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the respiratory care team members don’t have a high level of clinical skills, but the team can improve the work environment related to respiratory care and enhance the clinical skills. In the future, it is important that the respiratory care team receives the necessary specialty education and cooperation of the professional organizations. Sponsored Research - None