The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2011 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

EFFECTS OF PNEUMONIA FOLLOWING BURNS AND INHALATION INJURY IN CHILDREN.

Ronald Mlcak, Oscar E. Suman, David N. Herndon; Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX

Background: Inhalation injury continues to represent a major source of morbidity and mortality. Inhalation injury predisposes the burn patient to pneumonia. Pneumonia has been shown to increase mortality by 40-60%. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of pneumonia among pediatric burn patients with inhalation injury. Methods: Seven hundred sixty nine burn patients with inhalation injury were retrospectively studied. Patients were randomized into two groups; pneumonia vs. no-pneumonia. Outcome variables included demographics, length of stay (LOS), length of ventilation (LOV), incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and mortality. Results: Age was similar in both groups. The % TBSA burn in the pneumonia group was 62 +/- 23 vs. 48 +/- 25 in patients without (p < 0.05). The LOS for patients with pneumonia was 39 +/- 37 days vs. 31 +/- 29 days for those without (p < 0.05). The average length of ventilation in patients with pneumonia was 14 +/- 18 days vs. 5 +/- 11 days for those without (p < 0.05). The ARDS rate for patients with pneumonia was 38% vs. 4% for those without (p < 0.05). The mortality rate for patients with pneumonia was 43% vs. 7% for those without (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The presence of pneumonia in pediatric burn patients with inhalation injury significantly increases the LOS, LOV, incidence of ARDS and mortality. Therapeutic priorities should be aimed at prevention, early detection and aggressive treatment.
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