The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2011 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN KNOWLEDGE OF INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS AND ADHERENCE TO INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS.

Alana Finley, Paula Jo Belice, Giselle Mosnaim; Respiratory Care, Rush University, Chicago, IL

BACKGROUND: Asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates are high for low-income urban African American adolescents. Inadequate adherence to daily controller medications, specifically inhaled corticosteroids, may be a key factor leading to poor asthma outcomes in this population. It is important to study the role of potential reasons, including level of general asthma knowledge and knowledge of inhaled corticosteroids, which may be contributing to low adherence. METHODS: This study examined the relationship between both general asthma knowledge and knowledge of inhaled corticosteroids with adherence to prescribed daily inhaled steroids in a sample of urban African American adolescents with persistent asthma. The study was a pilot feasibility study to determine if a larger study should be conducted. Twelve urban African American adolescents between 16 and 20 years of age, diagnosed with persistent asthma, and prescribed a daily inhaled steroid medication, participated. Subjects completed the ZAP Asthma Knowledge Instrument and the Inhaled Corticosteroid Knowledge Questionnaire. Adherence was measured objectively using an electronic monitoring cap, the Doser CT, placed on their daily inhaled steroid medication. RESULTS: On average, participants answered 71% of the items correctly on the ZAP Asthma Knowledge Instrument (range 59-87%, n=11) and 60% of the items correctly on the Inhaled Corticosteroid Knowledge Questionnaire (range 0-86%, n=9). Mean adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroids, measured over a 21 day period, was 19% (range 0-71%, n=9). CONCLUSION: Overall, the results show that general asthma knowledge and knowledge of inhaled corticosteroids are much higher than adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroids. Perhaps knowledge may be necessary but not sufficient to promote adequate adherence. Given the small sample size and missing data, further investigation is warranted. Sponsored Research - None