The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2011 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

SELF-EFFICACY AT TAKING INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS PRESCRIBED DAILY INHALED STEROIDS FOR THE TREATMENT OF PERSISTENT ASTHMA

Emeli Yevu; Respiratory Care Program, Rush University, Chicago, IL

Background: African American adolescents have disproportionately high rates of asthma morbidity and mortality. Poor Adherence to prescribed daily inhaled corticosteroids among this population may be a contributing factor. This study explored levels of self-efficacy at taking daily inhaled corticosteroids in a sample of inner-city African American adolescents with persistent asthma prescribed daily inhaled corticosteroid medication. Methods: Nine urban African American adolescents completed this study. Eligibility criteria included: age 16-20 years (mean 17.8), persistent asthma, and being on a prescription daily inhaled steroid medication. All participants completed the Inhaled Corticosteroid Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Results: Participants average score on the Inhaled Corticosteroid Self-Efficacy Questionnaire was 57.11 % (range 33%-91%). Conclusion: This study showed that self-efficacy at taking inhaled corticosteroid medications among this sample of urban African American adolescents was low. Interventions aimed at improving self-efficacy at taking inhaled corticosteroids may increase adherence and improve asthma outcomes in this important population subgroup. This study warrants replication with a larger sample size. Sponsored Research – None