The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2011 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLOOD PRESSURE AND ITS EFFECT ON ARTERIAL SAMPLER FILLING TIMES DURING PERCUTANEOUS PUNCTURE IN HUMAN SUBJECTS.

Jennie R. Allison, Jeffrey J. Bender, Jeremy J. Goehring, Mihal D. Patel, Sean M. Niederst, F. Herbert Douce; Respiratory Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

BACKGROUND: When obtaining an arterial blood sample via percutaneous puncture there is a risk of accidentally obtaining venous blood. Conventional methods of confirming arterial blood at the bedside such as blood color and pulsatile return can be misleading in patients with low blood pressure or hypoxemia. PURPOSE: To determine if the arterial sampler filling time can be an accurate indicator of obtaining an arterial blood sample in patients with various blood pressures. METHODS: This study included 38 human subjects; 22 were adult patients ordered for a medically-necessary arterial blood sample by percutaneous arterial puncture; 16 were normal, healthy adult volunteers who had a venapuncture performed using an arterial blood sampler to collect 1 - 2 mL venous blood. Prior to a staff respiratory therapist performing the ordered arterial puncture, we measured and recorded the patient's non-invasive arterial blood pressure. During the arterial and venapuncture procedures we measured the amount of time it took to fill the sampler and the volume of blood obtained. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between mean arterial pressure and seconds of filling time per milliliter in the arterial group. A t-test for independent samples was calculated to determine if arterial sampler filling times are significantly different between arterial and venous groups. RESULTS: The Pearson correlation coefficient was -0.487 (p = 0.022). The mean sampler filling time was 15.1 secs/mL for the arterial group and 114.5 secs/mL for the venous group. The difference was significant (p = 0.000). CONCLUSION: Our results were consistent with Johnson's laboratory study showing a negative correlation between mean arterial pressure and sampler filling time. A respiratory therapist can use sampler filling time as an indicator of successful arterial puncture. Future studies should include a wider range of mean arterial pressures and a variety of samplers.
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