The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2011 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

COHERENCE OF COUNTING TALK TEST TO DETERMINE AN APPROPRIATE EXERCISE INTENSITY IN COPD PATIENTS WITH MODERATE AND SEVERE LEVEL.

Fabiana Cantarutti, Roberto Trevisan, Confalonieri Marco; Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria "Ospedali Riuniti Trieste", Trieste, Italy

Background Aerobic exercise programs have been developed respecting accepted standards of fixed percentages of maximum heart rate (55% -90%) or in the provision of maximum oxygen consumption (40-85% of VO2R; ACSM, 1998). The use of maximum heart rate is a practical parameter but in COPD patients it may be influenced both by heart problems and drug treatments in progress. Aims To evaluate if the Counting Test Talk, (as a variation of the Talk Test method), compared to the maximal FC values, can be used to estimate an appropriate exercise intensity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods 11 subjects (7 M and 4 F), average age of 71.58±7.2 years old, with COPD were examined; they underwent a cycle of re-training to strain for 8 weeks, 5 days a week. During this time a 30-minute workout was performed as follows: 4-5 minutes of warm-up until the set speed was reached (initially equal to '80% of 6'WT), at tree times, 5-15-25 minutes,Counting Test Talk values, heart rate (HR) and Borg RPE scale were recorded. These results were compared to the ones recorded, during rest time, when the subjects counted aloud (1-10000, 2-10000, etc.). The highest number reached was recorded as CTT during rest time. Results With the Pearson coefficient (r > 0.95) significant connections between CF and CTT were found. A similar result was observed between CTT and RPE, Borg scale (r > 0.93) and Borg scale RPE and HR (r > 0.90 ). Conclusions The results show that the CTT is a safe system, that can be self performed by the subject with COPD in order to control the training; when values equal 30-55% of the CTT during rest time, effort respects the ACSM recommendations concerning the intensity of the exercise, from moderate to strong level. Sponsored Research - None