The Science Journal of the American Association for Respiratory Care

2012 OPEN FORUM Abstracts

TITLE: HOW INCREASING THE NUMBER OF PROCEDURE CAPTURE PER PATIENT CAN HELP DETERMINE SHIFT STAFFING LEVELS.

Ernest Jones, Jenifer Graves, Herbert French, Fernando Gonzalez, Gina Giles-Oas, Richard M. Ford; Respiratory Care, UCSD Medical Center, San Diego, CA

Background: An ongoing issue for Respiratory care departments is the capture of therapist activity to justify staffing. These activities are specified in the American Association for Respiratory Care Uniform Reporting Manual. As a result of benchmarking it became apparent that we were not capturing all tasks. Through focus groups we determined that we could simplify the charge capture steps in our management information system (Clinivision) and better educate practitioners on the importance and process of documenting their workday activities. Methods: The medical center charge description master for Respiratory Care was refined to expand the number of non-chargeable activities included. These activities were then configured in Clinivision in a way to simplify data entry in which charges are captured through clinical documentation. The shift supervisors informed staff of the new procedures and emphasized the importance of documentation and the potential impact on staffing. The shift supervisors also audited records and followed up with the RTÂ’s who missed charting opportunities. The impact of these efforts was measured by comparing the charge per patient ratios for a two year period prior and a 6 month period after the initiative. Results: Baseline data collected over the prior two years indicated activities per patient average during of 23.4. After the initiative activities per patient where 25.4 resulting in an 8.75% increase. Conclusions: We observed an increase rate of activity capture with these initiatives. Considering that determination of staffing levels as well as comparing performance through benchmarking are largely dependent on counts of workday activity, it remains important to develop systems and programs that insure such activity is captured. Sponsored Research - None